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Indie Memphis grants for local filmmakers

Indie Memphis is offering four grants totaling $10,000 to help local filmmakers make narrative short film projects.

Two $4,500 production grants and two $500 production grants (for novice filmmakers) will be available to filmmakers living in Shelby County, DeSoto County or Crittenden County. All production must take place in Shelby, DeSoto and/or Crittenden counties and completed by August 1, 2015.

Application materials will be available this Friday (Aug. 1) and are due on Sept. 1.

For more info: www.indiememphis.com/indiegrants

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New Television Outlets for Filmmakers and Film Lovers

Xfinity subscribers will soon be able to see short films and other quality content shown at film festivals in the Southeastern United States, including Indie Memphis.

The Film Festival Collective includes festivals in nine states and will be available at no additional cost to Xfinity subscribers in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

Filmmakers who participated in past years with Indie Memphis will work with the Collective to lend works to the On Demand collection for a limited time.

For people without cable, a local television station will be offering something similar. Tina Tilton Entertainment Network (TTEN) has announced that Memphis film producers can take advantage of free airtime for one month but you must sign up by August 15, 2014.

Its programming includes classic cartoons and television series, children's programming as well as a few local Memphis-made movies, stage plays, music, comedy, reality, sports, kids shows, cartoons, modeling, competition, real estate, etc.

TTEN, which has been on the air since May, is at Channel 46.1, W46EF.

Contact TTEN at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


 

Geo Holmes story on Action News 5

Here's a video of WMC-TV's Action News 5 report on the death of Geo Holmes. 

On Tuesday, members of the Memphis film industry remember 59-year-old George Holmes for his work and free spirit.

Holmes was killed Sunday after being hit by a train while jogging in Germantown.

According to police, Holmes was wearing headphones at the time of his death and may not have heard the train coming.

Holmes' family says he ran in the area frequently. They also say it was not unusual for him to have earphones in during a run.

"That was Holmes' home, his territory, he felt safe there," said Memphis and Shelby County Film Commissioner Linn Sitler.

Sitler knew Holmes for more than 30 years, and said in addition to being an avid jogger, he was a nice and gentle spirit, and will be missed in the local film community.

Holmes owned the production company Beale Street Studios and worked with globally recognized clients including FedEx, International Paper, and CBS Sports.

"I have never experienced anything like the response we have experienced to George Holmes death," said Sitler.

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Geo Holmes was a treasure in Memphis video and film community

Here’s an excerpt from John Beifuss’ obituary of Geo Holmes in The Commercial Appeal:

To family and friends, George Holmes IV was known as Geo, pronounced “Joe.”

The folksy nickname with the distinctive spelling was appropriate. Mr. Holmes — killed Sunday when he was struck by a train near his Germantown home — was unpretentious and friendly yet hardly an average Joe. His unusual talents made him one of the most honored and in-demand film-and-video producers in the region, with a client roster that included FedEx, King Cotton, International Paper and CBS Sports.

“He had an amazing eye, and was a very gifted shooter,” said freelance Memphis producer-director Joe Mulherin. “He was just unafraid. I would argue he was one of the best handheld camera operators in Memphis.”

As a studio owner for 30 years, Mr. Holmes, 59, was a beloved mentor to succeeding generations of photographers, editors, sound designers and other artists and technicians.

He became a full-time professional videographer and editor in the early 1980s when he was hired for “PM Magazine,” a WHBQ-TV news-and-entertainment program, on the recommendation of co-host Linn Sitler. “He immediately started winning awards, and it was one of the best decisions I ever made,” said Sitler, now Memphis and Shelby County Film & Television Commissioner.

A memorial service will be held at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Germantown Presbyterian Church, with a reception to follow.

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'Sweetie Pie’s’ Premieres Tonight (7/12) on Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) - with a Memphis Flavor!

Acclaimed soul food chef and Sweetie Pie’s restaurant owner Miss Robbie Montgomery and her family are returning to OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network on Saturday, July 12 at 8 p.m. Central time for another lively season of the Pilgrim Studios-produced, NAACP Image Award-winning docu-series “Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s.”

The production is a client of the Memphis & Shelby County Film and Television Commission.

OWN says: In an all-new season, Miss Robbie and her son, Tim, prepare to expand their restaurant empire beyond St. Louis with a new location on historic Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee.  Getting the restaurant together is no easy task as they prepare to renovate the new location and find staff to train in time for the summer rush.  Meanwhile, back in St. Louis, Tim struggles with planning the move to Memphis while continuing to manage the local restaurants, and hires a new district manager, Ma’ri, who quickly implements change and starts ruffling the staff's feathers.  As if Miss Robbie’s plate wasn’t full enough, she’s also moving ahead with launching her new Sweetie Pie’s Sweet Tea line. It’s all systems go as this family works hard to expand their brand – one recipe at a time.

When talking about her new restaurant in Memphis, Sweetie Pie’s owner and co-manager Miss Robbie said, “You are never too old to stop dreaming and it truly is an honor to be invited to open up my next Sweetie Pie’s restaurant on historic Beale Street in Memphis.  I used to play in Memphis all the time during my days as an Ikette, and it’s great to be helping bring African American-owned businesses back to an area that has such significance to our community.”

See a video here: www.oprah.com/sweetiepiesfirstlook

About “Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s”: When Robbie Montgomery, a 1960s backup singer and former Ikette, suffered a collapsed lung and had to stop singing, she decided to pour her talents into another creative venture: a soul food restaurant called Sweetie Pie’s.  At her family-centered eateries, which include Sweetie Pie’s at the Mangrove, Sweetie Pie’s Upper Crust and the original Sweetie Pie’s established in 1996, which Miss Robbie runs with her son, Tim, both hilarity and drama are offered in equal measure.  This docu-series follows the loud, loving and often singing Montgomery family as they work to expand their empire, one soulful dish at a time.

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